Teaching

Anxiety in the Classroom—Another Learning Disability?

Anxiety is the most prevalent mental health crisis facing Americans. Eight percent of teens are diagnosed, though countless more suffer symptoms. Few seek help. Teachers are on the front lines wondering how to help as they see firsthand the consequences in both cognitive and psychological decline. As anxiety levels increase, executive functions diminish and IQ

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A Global Awareness Collaboration Across Disciplines

Teaching students broader concepts using an interdisciplinary approach promotes more authentic experiences and broader learning. Laura Duerr, author of the Spring 2008 Educational Horizons article, “Interdisciplinary Instruction, Educational Horizons,” notes that students also become more involved learners and are able to remove the imaginary discipline lines across subjects, allowing for deeper connections. What’s more, significant statistical research

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What Have Rubrics Got To Do With It?

It’s time to put your traditional rubrics aside and change the way students learn. In today’s assessment-focused education system, we must change the ways we assess students. Our focus should be on changing our classrooms into environments that are focused on learning with support from teacher feedback and self-assessment. With any luck, you still will

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Transporting Historical Figures from Past to Present

Perspective-writing activities bring “a bunch of dead guys” to life. To young adolescents, historical figures are a bunch of dead guys. Many students believe the issues, values, and perspectives of the people from the past hold no relevance to their lives in the 21st century. However, perspective-writing activities in the middle school social studies classroom

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