The ABCs of Middle Level Education

19 Dec 2016

Dropping the Needle on the B-Side for the Middle Grades

Dropping the Needle on the B-Side for the Middle Grades

By: Dru Tomlin

When I was in college, I was a radio DJ at WXJM 88.7FM—although only a handful of listeners would know. I worked the timeslots that felt like the air was made of stars and caffeine: 1am-3am and 6am-8am. During those early mornings, I would hurriedly walk from my dorm room in the dark with my backpack full of CDs, tapes, and records. I was known for playing songs by artists that few people had heard of, playing songs in odd combinations, and playing songs that weren’t on the A-side of the record. What does all of that have to do with middle level education? Stay tuned, listeners!

For those of you who may not be privy to the joys of records and LPs, here’s a quick lesson. The A-side of most records is typically where the artist and record company lined up the singles—those sure-fire, hot hit songs. Those were the songs that jumped up the charts, songs that fans craved to hear, and songs that stuck in your head. And as a music fan and a DJ, I appreciated the cool, hummable melodies of those songs. But for other reasons, I loved the B-sides even more. I wanted to hear the songs that didn’t make it to the A-side. I wanted to hear what made them different. I wanted to discover what the artist was trying out. I wanted to wonder about the crazy magic in those songs. I wanted to check out the risks on the record. So what do records and B-sides have to do with the field of middle level education? Stay tuned for more, listeners! Here comes the answer after this short break!

First, there’s a connection with the process of playing a record and working with young adolescents. When you play a record, it’s different from the digital music world we live in today. Today, you scan through your playlist on your phone, find what you want, and hit play/shuffle/repeat. With a record (especially as a DJ on air), you need to (1) find the groove in the LP for the song you want, (2) delicately place the needle on that groove, (3) find the exact spot where the song begins (leaving a little empty sound space), (4) plan what to say to intro the song, and (5) then hit play. It takes patience, time, a careful ear, and a disposition that accepts and embraces flaws. Because the song may start early. The song may start late. The song may be the wrong song or it may have words that may be wrong! There is nothing like an “on air” goof to get the heart racing! Working with young adolescents is very much the same process. How’s that? Stay tuned for even more, dear listeners!

If we think about young adolescents as music, we can’t simply plug them into a USB port, select the instructional song for the day, and hit the play button. Our students are like LPs, and like pedagogical DJs, we have to (1) patiently discover their unique record grooves, (2) take the time to find the music of their shifting lives, (3) carefully put our ears to listen as it plays to us, and (4) be open to the B-sides. Being open to the B-sides with young adolescents means that we need to anticipate and embrace the flaws and the unsettling songs they bring every day, because not every tune is going to be an A-side hit. Of course, our students will have great moments and bright ideas. And like hit songs on the A-side, we need to celebrate those “educational tunes.” We need to let their songs of excellence play for all to hear, and we should crank up the volume loudly and proudly. That’s why, for example, we put up their exemplary work on our boards, walls, and websites: to show them and the whole world that young adolescents can create glorious, melodious songs of learning. We love their hit songs on the A-side! But what about the other side of that record? Stay tuned to hear more, listeners!

We also have to love our students’ songs on the B-side, too. As we relish the harmony, we can’t neglect listening to the disharmony. As we tout the major chords, we can’t ignore the stories in the minor ones. As we hum the polished choruses, we can’t turn our ears away from the flawed, unfinished, discordant ones. That’s because the young adolescents we serve (even our “high achievers”) bring us their B-side songs every day, too. And those B-side tunes are different, and they are important, too. So in addition to turning up the volume on students’ exemplary work on the A-side, we need to honor their mistakes along the way. In addition to celebrating their friendships and leadership on the A-side, we need to be there when they feel friendless and without direction. In other words, our young adolescents need us to turn the record over, carefully drop the needle in the groove, and check out those B-side tunes. Perhaps that’s how we serve our students: by listening to the B-side. Perhaps that’s where we need to be to support their growth in the middle grades. For the record.

 

1 comments on article "Dropping the Needle on the B-Side for the Middle Grades"

This is such an interesting and unique comparison. Middle school aged students definitely have unique B-sides that need to be nurtured, honored, and have attention given to them.

—Stephanie
4/26/2017 3:20 PM

Please login or register to post comments.