The ABCs of Middle Level Education

20 Nov 2016

What’s Your Odyssey?

What’s Your Odyssey?

By: Dru Tomlin

Today's word is odyssey—so here's a quick Cliffs Notes review. In Homer's epic poem, The Odyssey, the main character, Odysseus navigates his way home through punishing seas, tempestuous storms, and loathsome creatures, and once he arrives at his doorstep, he must face more challenges from suitors who want him out of the picture. So what does this tale have to do with middle level education? How is the middle school journey like an odyssey? As we grow professionally and as we value young adolescents and prepare to teach them, it's important to take note of a simple fact: everyone's got an odyssey. Everyone is trying to get through something.

This is true for the teachers and staff in our buildings. We're all working through our own individual odysseys, and we need to treat each other accordingly. Just like This We Believe reminds us, “the school environment is safe, inclusive, and supportive of all” (p. 33-34). That must include the teachers, faculty and staff, too and how we support and include each other. Therefore, perhaps the first step is recognizing who we are. While Odysseus was heralded as a brave soldier, he was also a husband to Penelope and father to Telemachus. Similarly, while we are professionals and artists in the craft of teaching who soldier on in the classroom every day, we are also people—parents, siblings. aunts, uncles, children, former young adolescents. And we all need support in our journeys.

For me, as a first year teacher trying to make ends meet, I could have benefited from that. My odyssey included doing lesson plans in a pretty rough apartment (i.e., cockroaches were my fellow tenants) while also cooking in a short-order “restaurant” every night. I was also trying to make pedagogical ends meet during the day, teaching ninth and tenth grade Basic English—helping students who had never read, written, or spoken English or (even more challenging) helping students who knew English but had developed such a reluctance towards literacy that they hated my class, the work, and me personally. At the end of those early days in the school house, I would often sit at my desk and wonder why I was struggling. Like Odysseus, I felt like I was fighting my way through Charybdis and Scylla with little direction home. And I didn't want to tell anyone or ask anyone for help because I was afraid that other teachers (and administrators) would look at me like I was a failure. That was my odyssey. Fortunately, a duty to serve my students, a supportive grade level, a desire to stay gainfully employed, and an unflappable fear of failure got me through the rough seas—and I kept on teaching, learning, struggling, and growing. And looking back on my own odyssey teaching young adolescents, I wonder, “How do we recognize and support each other along the way? We know about using RTI to help students academically and behaviorally, but do we need an RTI support system for teachers and staff?

How do we provide teachers and staff with a secure harbor for reflection, questioning, and safety when times get tough?"

All of this is also true, of course, for the young adolescents we serve. What's their odyssey? Perhaps for some students their odyssey is the ride to and from school. As educators, we typically pull up to the school house in the safety and calm of our cars; meanwhile, our students arrive after dealing with the bus and the often choppy seas of social interaction, caustic language, and pecking orders that are found there. So how do we recognize that journey and support our students as they transition into our classrooms each morning? Perhaps for some students, their Odyssey materializes in specific subject areas. As we plan our lessons and create assessments, they are working through the self-efficacy they have with our content areas. In other words, their odyssey can be a thorny combination of how they've succeeded in each content area in the past, how they are currently succeeding in each content area, and how they think they will succeed in each content area going forward. How do we recognize that struggle and support our students on that tough cognitive and psychological journey? Perhaps for some students their odyssey is home itself. We can never be too sure about what our students face after school when they walk home and close the door. It's difficult to know exactly, but it's important enough to care.  It's vital enough that we acknowledge the reality. It's critical enough that we act on that knowledge in consistent, responsive ways for our students and for ourselves. And it's significant enough to realize that an odyssey is easier when we are there with warm support and a bright shoreline upon which to land.

 

1 comments on article "What's Your Odyssey?"

Dru,

I love reading these. Brings a fresh of breathe air to my day. Helps me remember why I am on my odyssey.

Colleen

—Colleen
11/21/2016 11:14 AM

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