The ABCs of Middle Level Education

15 Nov 2016

Oops! Did I Do That?

Oops! Did I Do That?

By: Dru Tomlin

Oops.

The familiar adage that we hear about making mistakes is that “to err is human.” It is part of the process of learning and growing. In order to walk, we first had to stumble and fall. In order to ride a bicycle, most of us first toppled and tipped over. But we got back up and walked again, rode again, and tried again. And as educators, we all make mistakes, and then we move forward. As a middle school administrator leading summer school, I once forgot a major chunk of the Pledge of Allegiance while I was reciting it on the morning announcements. As a middle school teacher in Atlanta, I once had to wear my wife's khakis to Back-to-School night because I accidentally packed them in my car instead of packing my own pants. In fact, I have committed enough errors to pack a middle school cafetorium 100 times over--and while I could have simply curled up into a weeping ball, I've always kept going.

So what drives us to continue despite the possibility of failure, of pain, of embarrassment? What drives our students to come to our classes each day in spite of these daily possibilities? What pushes us as educators to try out new ideas in front of fickle (and potentially resistant) audiences of young adolescents? I think part of the answer comes with the ingredients of support and response. Let’s go back to walking and biking; we sometimes forget about the support we received in those efforts. When learning to walk, someone may have held our hand to keep us upright or placed padding on sharp corners in case we fell. When learning to ride a bike, someone may have held onto the back of the seat or made us wear a helmet in case we crashed. And in both cases, someone probably picked us up, dusted us off, praised our attempt, and gave us another shot. That kind of support and response emboldened us to try again. And in both cases, doesn’t that typify what our students need as they learn and make mistakes in the middle grades? Isn’t that what we need as educators ourselves as we attempt to create dynamic learning environments?

We are also encouraged to try again by what is celebrated. It isn’t the oops that should define us and our students. It’s the getting back up, the learning from the oops, and the keeping on. Keeping on, not in spite of the oops—rather, inspired by the oops. Because oops are awesome. Oops are effort. Oops are risk. So why do we sometimes relegate error to the shadows and only illuminate perfection? What would happen to classroom culture if we put up examples in the hallway of student work that showed the messy and marvelous learning process? Incomplete pre-writes. Scribbled research notes. First attempts with an artistic technique. What would happen to school-wide culture if we took time in faculty meetings and grade level meetings to share instructional strategies that we struggled with? Rough warm-up activities. Unfortunate assessments. Group work gone wrong. First attempts with a teaching technique.

If we celebrated failure as much as we celebrated success, would we all take more risks and learn more—about what we can do, who we are, and what we could be? If we celebrated the uncertain journey to the finish line as much as we celebrated the ultimate victor, would more of us step up and step forward? I contend that moving everyone in the critical middle grades forward begins when we redefine what error is, support our efforts in the complex act of learning, honor the messy challenges and potential triumphs, and do so patiently, calmly, gracefully, empathetically, compassionately, humbly, sensitively, humanly, and humanely. Grit is not grown alone; rather, it is undergirded by guides on the side. Resilience is not raised in isolation; instead, it is reinforced by steady supports along the way.

 

2 comments on article "Oops! Did I Do That?"

I love and agree with what you said about the getting back up being what defines us and not the mistakes we make along the way. Everyone makes mistakes and no one gets it 100% perfect the first time they try something, at least that's what I tell my students whenever they work on something. I try to be their support as I have my colleagues as my support.

—Jessica
12/11/2016 9:08 PM

I have indeed had issues with the subject of "making mistakes" as a teacher in my past practicum experiences and I must say that is hard to accept them. I agree that everyone will make them though and it is not worth the effort in beating yourself up over them. When I am a first year teachers, I will hang on blogs like this one.

—Gunnar
12/11/2016 9:46 PM

Please login or register to post comments.