The Power of Observation in the Middle Grades!

3 Reasons Why Observation is the Key

By: Dru Tomlin


Observation is more than evaluation, especially in the middle level. Living and working in the middle grades means that we are constantly observing. From a literacy perspective, this means we are always analyzing text—verbal and nonverbal language. In other words, everything can be read, and we have to be critical participants in the craft of observation in order to reach every student, grow professionally, and create great schools. But what exactly does this mean in terms of improving middle level education?

First, in terms of reaching every student, we need to observe students in every landscape of their learning lives: in our classrooms, hallways, cafeterias, bus stops, locker rooms, and cyber worlds, as well. And we don't do this to police them and play "gotcha"; rather we observe students to understand them. So we can make learning more relevant and effective. So we can get to kids before they implode or explode. So we can notice the trends—the fashionable, the unfashionable, the humor, the anger, the joy, the stress. So we can remember what it feels, sounds, and looks like to be a young adolescent. While our primary motivation for observation shouldn't be to catch students in the act of misdeeds, keenly observing students on a consistent basis (with everyone involved) will drastically reduce your disciplinary referrals. Because you see issues before they become atomic blossoms.

Second, in order to grow professionally, we need to observe ourselves as teachers and leaders—and as learners. Teachers need to observe other teachers in the classroom, and administrators need to observe other administrators. Clearly, it's important to share best instructional practices at an interdisciplinary team meeting—to sit across the table and talk about what's been working with kids. But it's a completely different thing to sit in another teacher's class for an extended amount of time and observe how they put those instructional strategies into practice. Again, we don't observe to police, evaluate, or judge. We do peer observation as professional development because we are professionals developing—and what better way than to get support from other teachers?

In addition, we should closely observe our own verbal and nonverbal language in the classroom and school house. That kind of observation can be eye-opening and mind-altering. Set up a video camera (or your smart phone) and record yourself teaching—and then sit back and observe. Ask key questions about yourself and your pedagogy. What kind of language do you use? What gestures do you use? How much wait time do you actually give? Who do you call on? How do you use movement and proximity? What kind of support do you give? And then repeat the observational process again. If you only video-capture and observe one lesson, that's nice. But to truly know yourself, capture and analyze a week's worth of lessons—in every class. As a school administrator, I did that very thing for an entire semester. I recorded myself in interactions with teachers, staff, and parents, and then I analyzed those recordings for gestures, proxemics, head movement, clothing, etc. As a result, I learned a lot about dramaturgy, multi-modal interaction analysis, and how to survive the dissertation process, but I learned so much more about myself as a language user, a learner and as a school leader. And I learned that observation is a multipurpose tool that we can't simply leave on the shelf or use on sporadic occasions.

In the magnificent middle grades we should be training our eyes, minds, and hearts to observe every day. To reach every student. Grow professionally. And create great schools.


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1 comments on article "The Power of Observation in the Middle Grades!"

I think that it is extremely important to use the power of observations in the classroom. Honestly, I believe that a basic level of knowledge first comes from observing or modeling information and that is why I really enjoyed this piece. For example, during the education programs that we attend; we learn to become teacher by observing our clinical educators. Then, we get a chance of trying to prove ourselves by stepping in and using our own style to teach students. So, why should be stop this process once we start teaching in our classrooms. I really liked how the blog stated we should continue to observe our colleagues to continue to grow professionally. One way that we can do this is by using our planning time at school, such as taking one day every month to observe the best teachers in our school to continue to learn.

—Nicholas
4/11/2018 10:23 AM

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