ABCs of the Letter O in the Middle Grades: Openness

O My!

By: Dru Tomlin


Welcome back to the middle grades parade through the alphabet. Don't you feel proud that you made it through letter R? You should. And, once again, because young adolescents are rarely linear in nature, we're going to travel next to the letter O.

Before we get to the words themselves, have you checked out the letter O recently? It is round and ready for anything. Its shape is part of who it is and who we are in the middle level. The O reminds me of a rock that was once peppered by hard angles and coarse lines ... but then it was dropped in a swift current. Over time, those angles and lines were made smooth by that current's rushing water. With that rocky analogy, the O has it right—that's how we succeed in the middle grades and that's how we meet our students' needs. While maintaining our resilience and resolve as educators, we also adapt and change, so we can roll with anything that comes our way. Middle level educators are definitely smooth.

The sound of the letter O is perfect for the middle level, as well. It can be the sound of surprise, which is often what happens when working with young adolescents. Oh, what were you thinking? Oh, that's a really cool idea! Oh, let's talk about why we keep our hands to ourselves. And it can also be the sound of exclamation that we share at the end of a day. Oh, at last! Oh, I tried this awesome strategy in class! Oh, you want to know what Jimmy said in home room? Oh, you aren't going to believe this phone call I got. So in many ways, shouldn't the sound of the letter O be the official sound of the middle grades?

With all of that said, here is the first "O" word related to middle level education that comes to my mind.

Openness. In the middle grades, openness is a key ingredient. If we are going to truly reach and teach every young adolescent, we need to remain open—not closed. With everything that our students bring to the table, it can be easy to judge them, shut them down, and close our emotional doors on them. Because, sometimes, they push back against us. Because, sometimes, they find our last nerve and poke it and prod it. Because, sometimes, they flare up, shout out, and demand to know why they have to turn in their homework on time, spit out their gum, or pull up their pants in the hallway. So, yes, it can be tempting to be closed when all of that happens. But young adolescents need us to be open. Because they also ask awesome questions and search for the answers to queries that we never even thought to ask. Because they also randomly write you wonderful notes of spontaneous gratitude and stick them on your desk on their way out of class (or 10 years after they were in your class). Because they also hold the door open for you when you're trying to carry your graded papers, your teacher's edition, and your coffee mug all at once from the parking lot. In other words, we have to be open for both the challenging stuff and for their surprising triumphant moments. We have to console them when they are coarse. Lift them up when they are low. Be open when they are obstinate.

We also have to be open to understanding where students come from—physically and emotionally. In terms of where they physically come from, we have to remain open and cognizant of the fact that our kids come from homes and neighborhoods beyond the school walls. So what are their learning lives like after they leave every day? How are they supported once they get there? We have to be open and acknowledge that our classrooms and schools may be the only consistent places our students have.

And as far as where they come from emotionally, I think about the famous philosopher, Rakim (from Eric B & Rakim) who eloquently said, "It ain't where you're from, it's where you're at." While communities, neighborhoods, and geopraphy matter, we have to remain open to the fact that young adolescents live in tumultuous emotional landscapes, too. In other words, they may appear to have it all together on the outside or they may come from a privileged environment, but that doesn't mean they have it all together on the inside. They may be crumbling on the inside. They may be crying, shouting, and yelling on the inside. So we need to be open to that real possibility when we work with and reach every student.

What does openness look like? How do we act on openness? Use the two objects on either side of your head: your ears. Go to your students, ask caring, non-judgmental questions, and just listen. Open yourself to the possibility that you may learn something complicated, complex, real, and wondrous about your students.

So if we want to truly support young adolescents, being open isn't optional. It's imperative. It's necessary.


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